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“Muji Is Not A Trend”: How Design Fuels Muji’s Growth

The pioneering “no brand” brand views design as a solution for problems we encounter daily.

With around 400 stores in Japan alone, and another 300 operating internationally, housewares brand Muji shows no signs of slowing its rapid clip of expansion. For the past 35 years, the company has unwaveringly remained faithful to its philosophy of functional, quality design offered at a reasonable price and plans to stay the course for the next 35 years. But in a climate that constantly celebrates novelty, how can Muji continue to thrive?

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Q&A: Sagmeister & Walsh Announces It’s Moving By Getting Naked And Lying In Cockroaches

The New York design duo talks to Co.Design about why they finally decided to upgrade their digs.

When most design firms change offices, they set up an address forward. But when Stefan Sagmeister & Jessica Walsh of the eponymous Sagmeister & Walsh were finally driven out of their New York offices by vermin and cockroaches, they set up shop in the Flatiron district and announced the change of address with their own eccentric panache: stripping down naked, getting dirty, and covering themselves in bugs.

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Lawrence Lessig’s Crazy Plan To Run For President, Fix Campaign Finance, And Resign

The Harvard law professor says America’s political system needs an emergency intervention. Can he pull it off?

Over the last 20 years of talking about the problem of big money in politics, Congress hasn’t actually voted to do anything about it, and it’s unlikely that they will anytime soon. So Harvard University law professor Lawrence Lessig has cooked up a crazy plan to force some change: He’s trying to crowdfund a presidential campaign focused on the single issue of campaign finance reform.

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What The City Of The Future Looked Like In 1925

We’re still missing some of the best ideas.

Even today, predictions of the future feature flying cars, Blade Runner-style advertising hoardings, and other conspicuous technology. But in the August 1925 issue of Popular Science magazine, then-president of the Architectural League of New York, Harvey W. Corbett, not only made uncannily-accurate forecasts of today’s cities, he had some design ideas which are finally beginning to become real.

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos On NYT Expos√©: “I Don’t Recognize This Amazon”

The Amazon chief responds to a New York Times article critiquing working conditions at the company.

Over the weekend, the New York Times published a deep dive into working practices at Amazon, alleging that many of the company’s current and former employees “tried to reconcile the sometimes-punishing aspects of their workplace with what many called its thrilling power to create.” One former employee told the Times that he regularly saw coworkers crying at their desks.

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Explained: The Secret Language Of New York City’s Signage

Every sign tells a story, according to the Cooper Union’s Alexander Tochilovsky.

When you walk down the streets of New York City, you aren’t walking just through the present. You are surrounded by the canyon walls of the past, and the signage around you—the building names, the business signs, the faded slogans—are actually fossils, peeking out from the strata of decades gone by into the present.

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Microsoft Wants To Put Windows 10 On Every Connected Gadget

Microsoft is encouraging makers to build security systems, automated lighting controls, and other “Internet of Things” gadgets on Windows 10.

Apple and Google won the first battle for the “post-PC” world, with Android and iOS powering virtually every handheld gadget. Microsoft Windows scarcely registers its presence on mobiles, at under 3% market share (according to comScore). But Microsoft is fighting hard for the next round, which will bring online factory machinery, security systems, climate controls, electronic door locks, and just about every other gadget into the Internet of Things (otherwise known as the IoT).

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